Pumpkin Flowers

May 23, 2009 at 3:37 pm (Vegetables)

DSC00051 Two days ago I began to notice these  precious,  large,   orange flowers on my  pumkin plants.  Their petals    were paper  thin, and they  shriveled away a day or so  after blooming.  They were so ephermeal,  they  seemed truly  precious, and I had to get capture their  passing beauty before they entirely disappeared,  hence the pix. One thing buds to mind, these  pumpkin  flowers sure don’t give much opportunity for cross-pollination!  I am guessing since pumpkins grown in batches of vines, normally this would be ok. But these plants are only a month old and have yet to become vine-like.

DSC00048 Since we all know a person can find anything on the  internet, I looked up the flowers and found this article on pollination. Evidently there is a problem, and gardeners are advised to pick male flowers and pollenate female buds with the stamins. Male vs. female flowers are recognized by whether a bulb is present immediately under the flower. Females have bulbs, which if pollinated, become squash pumpkins. When I find a male flower, I will let readers know how long they last once picked in terms of the stamin.http://gardeningwithwilson.com/2008/04/22/pollinating-pumpkin-flowers/

DSC00049Update: There are usually far more male than female.  I looked at my pumpkin plants this morning and  almost all of the flowers, whether budded or still  growing, were male. I from all counted, out of  perhaps 20 only 2 were female. At there base you  will find small bulbs that look like miniature  watermelons (green and striped). I tore a male  flower, removed the pedals, and rubbed the stamin in the pistil. Just to ensure pollination I left the stamen in the pistil. I will let readers know if this translates to a sugar pumpkin!

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2 Comments

  1. Flowers said,

    You have posted wonderful pictures of pumkin flowers that made me bloom here for a very long time.

  2. chapelmouse said,

    Thanks Flowers! You’re welcome!

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